Cultybraggan POW Camp, Perthshire 29th Sept 18 SOLD OUT

£39.00

Join the Scottish Ghost Nights Team as they explore Cultybraggan POW Camp. A fascinating location for a ghost hunt with a well known haunted history

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Join the Scottish Ghost Nights Team as they explore an intriguing part of Scottish history. Cultybraggan POW Camp is a fascinating location for a ghost hunt with an established haunted history. Maybe not surprising given it’s dark past.


History of Cultybraggan POW Camp

Named PoW camp No 21, built in 1941 to house 4,000 Category A prisoners, Cultybraggan was a ‘black camp’, holding those considered the most committed and fanatical Nazi PoWs, mainly young Waffen-SS, Fallschirmjäger and U-boat crew. Army, Kriegsmarine, Air Force and SS prisoners were held in separate compounds, as were the officers.  Ringleaders of the Devizes plot — to break as many as 250,000 PoWs out of camps across the country in 1944 and attack Britain from within — were sent to Camp 21 at Comrie. Cultybraggan POW campThese included Feldwebel Wolfgang Rosterg, a known anti-Nazi who was sent by mistake. He was lynched, and five of the prisoners were hanged at Pentonville Prison for his murder, the largest multiple execution in 20th-century Britain. Amongst the prisoners was Heinrich Steinmeyer, soldier in the Waffen SS since 1942, who was captured in Normandy in August 1944. He died in 2014 and left a bequest of £384,000 to the village which has been put into the Heinrich Steinmeyer Legacy Fund.

Post World War 2

Following the war, in 1949, Cultybraggan was opened as a training camp. It was used by the Regular Army, the Territorial Army and was popular with Cadet units for their annual camps. The camp covered some 8 acres  and could accommodate 600 personnel in a mixture of huts and tents. Units rotating through the camp enabled 80,000 ‘man training days’ of military exercising, including adventure training, cross-country driving, and helicopter operations, using the 12,000 acre Tighnablair Training Area, leased from the Drummond Estate. Some of the original 100 Nissen huts on the western side of the camp were demolished in the 1970s to make way for a firing range, but the majority remain. The surviving huts, together with an assault course and modern Officers’ Mess facility, make Cultybraggan “one of the three best preserved purpose-built WWII prisoner of war camps in Britain

Cold War

As part of the Cold War defence of the nation, an underground Royal Observer Corps (ROC) monitoring post was installed in 1960. Although it closed in September 1991, when the ROC was stood down, it is still Cultybraggan POW Campaccessible. In 1990, an underground Regional Government Headquarters (RGHQ) bunker was completed in the north east corner of the camp site to replace the Scottish North Zone Headquarters bunker at Troywood (Anstruther). In the event of war, the Secretary of State for Scotland, the BBC, British Telecom, and other important organisations would have operated from here. However, the Cold War threat receded almost as soon as the bunker was completed, and the £3.6 million, two storey, underground structure was declared obsolete, and closed. Sold to the Army, the bunker was added to the military training facilities.

Cultybraggan POW camp today

The camp ceased to be used by the military in 2004, and now belongs to the Comrie Development Trust; who have been undertaking works to refurbish the buildings and make units for local businesses in the Nissan huts.

Ghost Hunting at Cultybraggan POW Camp

Your event will include a site tour, a ghost hunting workshop and vigils with our expert paranormal team. It will be 5 hours of spooky, creepy fun. Definitely not for the feint hearted…….

Saturday 29th September

9pm to 2am

Over 18s only, no alcohol or pregnant ladies

Perthshire, Comrie PH6 2AB